Americana (Native American/Mythos of the Americas)

Stories that involves Native Americans and Native American culture (natives to both Americas).  The narrator could just be Native American in origin.  Or the plot borrows and impliments ideas from past cultures that once ruled the Americas (think Natives such as Cherokee, Navajo, Hopi, Mayans, Inca, etc.).  This category is not genre specific, so you will find all genres so long as the emphasis of the books is focused with the topic.

Books are listed by author’s last name.  A series will be counted as one entry.  The summary of the first book will be the only summary given as later book summary may include spoilers.  Titles that are hyperlinked are linked to their Goodreads’ page.

Note:  Books on this list are here because they fit the criteria (unrestrictive) of the category.  I am not saying these correctly depict the race or culture nor am I saying these books are well written or the opposite: they aren’t well written.  They just simply fit the simple criteria.

Sherman ALEXIE

The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian

In his first book for young adults, bestselling author Sherman Alexie tells the story of Junior, a budding cartoonist growing up on the Spokane Indian Reservation. Determined to take his future into his own hands, Junior leaves his troubled school on the rez to attend an all-white farm town high school where the only other Indian is the school mascot. Heartbreaking, funny, and beautifully written, The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian, which is based on the author’s own experiences, coupled with poignant drawings by acclaimed artist Ellen Forney, that reflect the character’s art, chronicles the contemporary adolescence of one Native American boy as he attempts to break away from the life he was destined to live.

Flight

The best-selling author of multiple award-winning books returns with his first novel in ten years, a powerful, fast and timely story of a troubled foster teenager — a boy who is not a “legal” Indian because he was never claimed by his father — who learns the true meaning of terror. About to commit a devastating act, the young man finds himself shot back through time on a shocking sojourn through moments of violence in American history. He resurfaces in the form of an FBI agent during the civil rights era, inhabits the body of an Indian child during the battle at Little Big Horn, and then rides with an Indian tracker in the 19th Century before materializing as an airline pilot jetting through the skies today. When finally, blessedly, our young warrior comes to rest again in his own contemporary body, he is mightily transformed by all he’s seen.

Kelley ARMSTONG

Gathering Calling RisingDarkness Rising:  The Gathering (book 1); The Calling (book 2); The Rising (book 3)

Note: Companion Series to Darkest Powers

Sixteen-year-old Maya is just an ordinary teen in an ordinary town. Sure, she doesn’t know much about her background – the only thing she really has to cling to is an odd paw-print birthmark on her hip – but she never really put much thought into who her parents were or how she ended up with her adopted parents in this tiny medical-research community on Vancouver Island.  Until now.  Strange things have been happening in this claustrophobic town – from the mountain lions that have been approaching Maya to her best friend’s hidden talent for “feeling” out people and situations, to the sexy new bad boy who makes Maya feel . . . . different. Combine that with a few unexplained deaths and a mystery involving Maya’s biological parents and it’s easy to suspect that this town might have more than its share of skeletons in its closet.

Lynne Reid BANKS

Return of the Indian Secret of the Indian Mystery of the Cupboard Key to the Indian

Indian in the Cupboard:  The Indian in the Cupboard (book 1); Return of the Indian (book 2); The Secret of the Indian (book 3);  The Mystery in the Cupboard (book 4); The Key to the Indian (book 5)

At first, Omri is unimpressed with the plastic Indian toy he is given for his birthday. But when he puts it in his old cupboard and turns the key, something extraordinary happens that will change Omri’s life for ever.  For Little Bull, the Iroquois Indian brave, comes to life…
Joseph BRUCHAC
Years ago, seventeen-year-old Apache hunter Lozen and her family lived in a world of haves and have-nots. There were the Ones-people so augmented with technology and genetic enhancements that they were barely human-and there was everyone else who served them. Then the Cloud came, and everything changed. Tech stopped working. The world plunged back into a new steam age. The Ones’ pets-genetically engineered monsters-turned on them and are now loose on the world.Lozen was not one of the lucky ones pre-C, but fate has given her a unique set of survival skills and magical abilities. She hunts monsters for the Ones who survived the apocalyptic events of the Cloud, which ensures the safety of her kidnapped family. But with every monster she takes down, Lozen’s powers grow, and she connects those powers to an ancient legend of her people. It soon becomes clear to Lozen that she is not just a hired gun. As the legendary Killer of Enemies was in the ancient days of the Apache people, Lozen is meant to be a more than a hunter. Lozen is meant to be a hero.
Scott O’DELL

The Spanish Slavers were an ever-present threat to the Navaho way of life.  One lovely spring day, fourteen-year-old Bright Morning and her friend Running Bird took their sheep to pasture.  The sky was clear blue against the red buttes of the Canyon de Chelly, and the fields and orchards of the Navahos promised a rich harvest.  Bright Morning was happy as she gazed across the beautiful valley that was the home of her tribe.  She turned when Black Dog barked, and it was then that she saw the Spanish slavers riding straight toward her.

Cynthia Leitich SMITH

Rain Is Not My Indian Name

It’s been six months since Rain’s best friend Galen died, and up until now she has succeeded in shutting herself off from the world. But when controversy arises around her Aunt Georgia’s Indian Camp in their mostly white midwestern community, Rain decides to face the outside world again–at least through the lens of her camera.

Elizabeth George SPEARE

The Sign of the Beaver

Twelve-year-old Matt is left on his own in the Maine wilderness while his father leaves to bring the rest of the family to their new settlement. When he befriends Attean, an Indian chief’s grandson, he is invited to join the Beaver tribe and move north. Should Matt abandon his hopes of ever seeing his family again and go on to a new life?

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